Hampshire Pig

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Hampshire Pig


Hampshire pigs are quite common in America, despite their origins in the United Kingdom. They are the fourth most recorded breed of pig in the United States. Like most pigs, they are intelligent animals, and can even be taught commands and tricks like dogs.


Content List

1. Scientific & Common Names

2. Characteristics

3. Breeding

4. Behavior

5. History

6. Present Status

7. References



Scientific & Common Names

Kingdom – Animalia

Phylum – Chordata

Class – Mammalia

Order – Artiodactyla

Family – Suidae

Genus – Sus

Species – S. scrofa domesticus

Common Names – Hampshire Pig, McGee Hog, McKay, Saddleback, Ring Middle, Thin Rind, Belted Hog



Characteristics

Hampshire pigs have a distinctive black coloration with a light-colored band around their middle that contains their front legs. They are well-muscled and known for growing quickly.


Breeding

Much of the early development of this breed took place in Kentucky, where the first records association was formed to focus on maintaining the breed's purity. It was called the American Thin Rind Association, which later was changed to the American Hampshire Records Association.


Behavior

Hampshire pigs are highly intelligent animals, and are known for being very hardy. Hampshires are renowned for being great mothers, with a calm and placid demeanor.


History

Hampshires are thought to be the oldest breed of American swine. They were brought to the US from Hampshire County, England in the early 1800s. The breed began to gain in popularity in the states after the 1930s, and has remained a very in-demand breed ever since.


Present Status

There are over two billion Hampshire pigs in the world, so the breed is in no danger of disappearing. They are the fourth most common breed of pig in the United States.


References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hampshire_pig

http://nationalswine.com/about/about_breeds/Hampshire.php

http://www.ansi.okstate.edu/breeds/swine/hampshire/