Difference between revisions of "Giganotosaurus"

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[[File:303929_Gigantosaurus.jpg|frame|Giganotosaurus]]
 
[[Category:Dinosaurs]]
 
[[Category:Dinosaurs]]
Giganotosaurus, Giant Southern Lizard, lived in the first part of the Late Cretaceous of South America.  These gigantic allosaurids were the apex predators in fauna dominated by the supersized titianosaurs, medium sized saltasaurines and medium size abeilesaurs.  Ornithiscians are the medium to small plant eaters.  They disappear from the fossil record when the giant titiansaurs decline.  Giganotosaurus was closely related to or a species of Carchardontosaurus.
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[https://www.safariltd.com/giganotosaurus Giganotosaurus] (Gee-gah-note-oh-sore-us), Giant Southern Lizard, lived in the first part of the Late Cretaceous of South America.  These gigantic allosaurids were the apex predators in fauna dominated by the supersized titianosaurs, medium sized saltasaurines and medium size abeilesaurs.  Ornithiscians are the medium to small plant eaters.  They disappear from the fossil record when the giant titiansaurs decline.  Giganotosaurus was closely related to or a species of Carchardontosaurus.
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== Content List ==
  
'''Content List'''
 
  
 
1. Genera & species
 
1. Genera & species
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'''Genera and Species'''
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== Genera and Species ==
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Classification:  
 
Classification:  
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'''Characteristics'''
 
Giganotosaurus was longer but lighter than Tyrannosaurus and competed with Spinosaurus as the largest theropod.  The partial skulls were initially restored with too great a length.  The teeth were designed like steak knives for cutting unlike the crushing spike like teeth of Tyrannosaurus.
 
  
'''Size'''
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== Characteristics ==
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[https://www.safariltd.com/giganotosaurus Giganotosaurus] was longer but lighter than Tyrannosaurus and competed with Spinosaurus as the largest theropod.  The partial skulls were initially restored with too great a length.  The teeth were designed like steak knives for cutting unlike the crushing spike like teeth of Tyrannosaurus.
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== Size ==
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LENGTH: 14 m (46 ft).
 
LENGTH: 14 m (46 ft).
WEIGHT: 6 - 8 tones.
 
  
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WEIGHT: 6 - 8 tons.
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== Behavior ==
  
'''Behavior'''
 
  
 
Apex predator bone beds of the related Mapusaurus may indicate they were social.  They were not evolved for running as their prey the giant sauropods like Andesaurus were not fast animals.
 
Apex predator bone beds of the related Mapusaurus may indicate they were social.  They were not evolved for running as their prey the giant sauropods like Andesaurus were not fast animals.
 
    
 
    
  
'''History of Discovery'''
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== History of Discovery ==
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Discovered Coria and Salgado, 1995 and known from a 70% complete but disarticulated skeleton that includes most of the skull.
 
Discovered Coria and Salgado, 1995 and known from a 70% complete but disarticulated skeleton that includes most of the skull.
  
  
'''Paleoenvironment'''
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== Paleoenvironment ==
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Found in Argentina South America short wet season in arid plains with forests restricted to rivers.
 
Found in Argentina South America short wet season in arid plains with forests restricted to rivers.
  
'''References'''
 
  
1. Paul, G. (2010). The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs (pp. 2520). Princeton, New Jersey: University Press Princeton.
 
  
2. Worth, G. (1999). The Dinosaur Encyclopaedia (pp. 1020). Scarborough, Western Australia: HyperWorks Reference Software.
 
  
3. [http://dinotoyblog.com/2010/07/09/Giganotosaurus-carnegie-collection-by-safari-ltd/]
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== References ==
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1. Paul, G. (2010). The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs (pp. 2520). Princeton, New Jersey: University Press Princeton.
  
4. [http://www.dinosaurcollectorsitea.com/saCretaceousTheropod.html]
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2. Worth, G. (1999). The Dinosaur Encyclopaedia (pp. 1020). Scarborough, Western Australia: HyperWorks Reference Software.

Latest revision as of 14:19, 28 July 2017

Giganotosaurus

Giganotosaurus (Gee-gah-note-oh-sore-us), Giant Southern Lizard, lived in the first part of the Late Cretaceous of South America. These gigantic allosaurids were the apex predators in fauna dominated by the supersized titianosaurs, medium sized saltasaurines and medium size abeilesaurs. Ornithiscians are the medium to small plant eaters. They disappear from the fossil record when the giant titiansaurs decline. Giganotosaurus was closely related to or a species of Carchardontosaurus.


Content List

1. Genera & species

2. Characteristics

a. Size

b. Behavior

3. History of Discovery

4. Paleoenvironment

5. References



Genera and Species

Classification: Theropoda, Tetanura, Carnsauria, Carcharodontosauridae

Species: G. carolinii



Characteristics

Giganotosaurus was longer but lighter than Tyrannosaurus and competed with Spinosaurus as the largest theropod. The partial skulls were initially restored with too great a length. The teeth were designed like steak knives for cutting unlike the crushing spike like teeth of Tyrannosaurus.


Size

LENGTH: 14 m (46 ft).

WEIGHT: 6 - 8 tons.


Behavior

Apex predator bone beds of the related Mapusaurus may indicate they were social. They were not evolved for running as their prey the giant sauropods like Andesaurus were not fast animals.


History of Discovery

Discovered Coria and Salgado, 1995 and known from a 70% complete but disarticulated skeleton that includes most of the skull.


Paleoenvironment

Found in Argentina South America short wet season in arid plains with forests restricted to rivers.



References

1. Paul, G. (2010). The Princeton Field Guide to Dinosaurs (pp. 2520). Princeton, New Jersey: University Press Princeton.

2. Worth, G. (1999). The Dinosaur Encyclopaedia (pp. 1020). Scarborough, Western Australia: HyperWorks Reference Software.